Mortgage Calculators

Mortgage Payment Calculator

Loan Type:

A mortgage payment calculator is a great tool to help home buyers estimate the cost of monthly mortgage payments. Whether you're interested in mortgage refinancing or looking to see how much tax you can deduct, these free mortgage calculator tools are here to help you. If you're interested in simple calculation of your mortgage use the tool calculator above. Otherwise, look through the different mortgage calculators below.


 

Purchase Calculators

How Much Can I Afford?

This calculator helps you identify how much you are able to afford when you are searching for a home.

How Much Do I Need to Qualify?

Compare your total monthly obligations including your total mortgage payment to your monthly income.

Should I Buy or Rent?

Our Buy vs Rent Calculator help you analyze the total cost of renting versus the total cost of owning.

Tax Benefits of Buying

This calculator estimates the tax benefit of buying a home.

APR Loan Calculator

Estimate the Annual Percentage Rate (APR) for a mortgage loan using your mortgage rate.

ARM Loan Payment

Compute your initial and estimate your future payments with Mortgage 101 ARM Loan Payment Calculator.


Refinance Calculators

Should I Pay Points - Refinance?

Helps you understand if you should pay loan points during your refinance.

Refinance Debt Consolidation Management

Figure how long before your savings equal the cost of obtaining a new consolidation loan.

Mortgage Principal

Figure your principal balance after any number of payments.

Extra Payments

Figures how long your mortgage will last depending on how much you pay monthly.

Mortgage Payment Amortization

This calculator will amortize your mortgage over the loan period based on your input.

APR ARM Loan

Estimate the Annual Percentage Rate for an Adjustable Rate Mortgage based on input parameters.

The Mortgage 101 Blog

Mortgage101 Blog
FROM THE MORTGAGE101 BLOG

Lenders Step In For Secondary Market on Jumbo Loans

Most mortgage banks and lenders traditionally prefer to sell off any home loans they make to the secondary market as soon as they make them. But for one segment of the market – the jumbo loan – lenders are having a change of heart. The secondary market – investors who buy up securities made of mortgages that have been originate by banks and bundled together in groups – has only been able to purchase 2.3 percent of all jumbo loans made in the first half of 2014, according to industry newsletter Inside Mortgage Finance. When compared with the 49.3 percent of jumbo loans in 2005 that were securitized, you have to ask yourself why. For starters, mortgage loan standards have been severely restricted since the housing collapse six years ago. It has been much tougher for those with small down payments or less-than-perfect credit histories to obtain home loan financing. On the other hand, those seeking jumbo loans – mortgages over $417,000 in most of the country and $625,500 in the nation’s priciest areas – typically have very large down payments and great credit as well. These loans are viewed as safe bets and have become a highly desired commodity for banks and investors alike. Because these are the least risky mortgages and because the jumbo loan market is booming right now, many lenders are deciding to hold these loans on their books instead of selling them off. The lenders are making more money from those jumbo loans with annual interest rates of roughly 4.2 percent whereas the savings account rate is only around 1 percent a year these days. And the changes in the market are turning into benefits for jumbo borrowers as well. Lenders who plan to keep the loans themselves can usually offer better interest rates or more attractive loan terms. Says Guy Cecala, Inside Mortgage Finance CEO and publisher, “The case could be made that borrowers are better off without a mortgage-backed securities program than they were before,” he says. more

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